Tag Archives: schofield

Time4apint – British Watches

My posts have been a little infrequent of late. This is broadly as a consequence of real work, tax returns and another holiday.  To try and put this right and buy myself a little time to write my next review I thought I would share my latest horological discovery – the “time4apint”podcast. Chris Mann produces these charming little chats on what seems like a monthly basis. They are an excellent way to pass a little dead time waiting for trains and other idle moments.

In particular and the most pertinent to the British theme of this blog was podcast 39 that was published last week, entitled “Jonathan’s Modern British watches” in which Chris discusses with collector Jonathan Hughes some of his watches. A Schofield, a Pinion, a CWC and a Bremont.

You can listen to it yourself following this link :

Enjoy

Schofield Telemark – the first review

After several years of admiring the distinctive watches from Sussex’s most famous  watch company, I managed to exchange a few words with the founder Giles Ellis.  On an off chance, I asked if there might be the opportunity to do a review.
Just after the Christmas break an e-mail arrived out of the blue. Giles had remembered and asked if I would like to do the first review  of their new Telemark, a watch I had admired at its launch during the Salon QP week.
Schofield Telemark
 
The Telemark sits within the ‘Markers’ family of Schofield watches, which was originally pioneered by the Daymark. This model being inspired by the 1960s war film ‘Heroes of Telemark’. 

This watch has features common to previous watches however, the Telemark stands alone as a bold addition to the Markers collection. It is Schofield’s first white dialled watch, Schofield’s first fully numerated dial and even Schofield’s first design to be inspired by a coastline outside of the British Isles.

Before giving more details I think it is important to describe what this very particular watch is like to wear.

But before covering the watch I cannnot ignore the very impressive black Osmo Ash box, below. Though it does make you wonder whether someone with a collection of several watches can find space to store the increasingly large and impressive packaging.

The Telemark Box
After a lifetime of relatively regular sized watches I have recently got used to my slightly larger than my usual, Pinion. The  44mm Telemark takes my “large experience” to another level, especially the case height.
To my surprise once on my wrist it actually doesn’t feel that large and it is perfectly possible to almost not notice your wearing it and I didn’t even once risk bashing it on walls or furniture which I frequently do with my personal Speedmaster. The watches distinctive character though does not really come from it’s size but the design itself and the white dial in particular. The white/grey/brushed steel combination  does express a wintery “Telemark” vibe.
Telemark on the wrist
The first thing I did then was to put the watch to my ear, The dial does not mention automatic and I had not yet read the specifications, I wanted to understand wether it was an auto or manual. To my surprise I couldn’t hear the sound of a rotor inside the case. To be sure I then checked the spec sheet and discovered it was in fact an auto. I imagine the case thickness keeps the watch quiet.
Design wise there are some many details to be appreciated. The most obvious on my particular watch being the fucsia lining to the grey strap and the design of the caseback.
The reverse of the Telemark
Should this strap not be to your taste one of the wonderful features of the Schofield range is the wide choice of straps available making the watches even more individual. Then we shouldn’t forget the customised straps from Schofield+Cudd. I kept thinking this watch would be great on one of the Harris tweed straps, something I would never consider for any other watch I can think of.
Once turned  over the more design details become visible, for the first few days I continued to see something I had not noticed. For example the Schofield brand name being written very discretely in the number 6 position on the dial. There are so many little quirky features I will resist the temptation to list them but for me the dial hand combination works really well.
Then there is my favorite detail of all the crown and the groove in the case that makes it really easy to operate.
Schofield Telemark Crown
 The Technical Details Are:
  • Fully numerated submarine dial
  • Dimensions – 44mm diameter base, 42mm bezel, 15.1mm high
  • The word ‘Schofield’ replaces 9 minute marks on the chapter ring
  • The hour markers in the chapter ring are black anodised appliqués filled • with Super-LumiNova C5
  • Case – Vapour-blasted stainless steel
  • Weight – 134 grams with strap
  • Date disk reprinted for horizontal readability at 4:30
  • All the parts of the hands and the windows line up when overlapping
  • The second hand tapers towards the tip and the counterpoise
  • The second hand counterpoise is filled with lume
  • The case has a nail rebate for pulling out the crown
  • The crown also has a groove for your nails to grip to pull out
  • The case has a slight radius on the outer edge of the bezel
  • The box is Osmo ash, the queen of English timbers
  • Colour – Silver
  • Crown – Push in, machine finish stainless steel, engraved
  • Dial – White, luminescent applied markers Super-LumiNova C5
  • Hands – Laddered baton, Super-LumiNova C3
  • Movement – ETA 2824-2
  • Power reserve – 38 hours
  • Functions – Hours, minutes and seconds and date
  • Case back – Stainless steel, engraved with Jomfruland lighthouse
  • Crystal – Sapphire
  • Water resistance – 200m
  • Strap – Your choice
  • Strap bars – Stainless, vapour-blasted
  • Buckle – Brushed stainless steel, engraved
  • Serialisation – Sequential numbering
  • Warranty – 2 years

For more information and lots of really super images you should visit the Schofield website.

So in conclusion, I really enjoyed my time with the Telmark. The perfect location for a review would have been my February ski break, but I already had other horological commitments for that. At the same time I was really pleased to have the opportunity to write the first review which I did not want to postpone. Maybe I have another chance for next February.

My thanks to Melodie of Schofield for organising the logistics of this loan and for her cheery notes.

London Watch Week

I don’t think last week was officially know as “watch week” but that is how it turned out for me, a few events growing out of the Salon QP.

Although maybe “week” might not be quiet the right definition as for me everything started mid-October when I met Nicholas Bowman-Scargill for a catch-up. We had first met a year earlier, before he re-launched the Fears brand at the Salon QP 2016. Nicholas told me all about his first year and the three new watches he would be announcing at this years show.  He revealed these in order of significance. The first being an additional colour to the existing Redcliff range this time a pretty striking Passport Red.

Redcliff Passport Red

Next I was expecting a “mechanical Redcliff”, which seemed to be the obvious development. But no, the next watch Nicholas showed me was the quartz Redcliff Continental. The Continental version has a window just the “6” position enabling the wearer to display a second time zone. A very useful feature for international travellers or people with far flung families.

The Continental Range

Then came the news I had been expecting the Fears mechanical watch, not however as I was imagining a Redcliff but a completely new watch – the Brunswick the first mechanical watch for the new Fears.

The Brunswick concept & inspiration

At this time Nicholas was only able to show me a drawing of the watch as the prototype had yet been delivered.  The finished watch was due to be shown at the Watchmakers Club evening before the Salon QP. I will dedicate a post to this interesting new watch.

This brings me to the start of “Watch Week”; the first event being the Watchmaker’s Club “Night Before” evening in a private club in London on Wednesday.  The Watchmakers Club is a new platform, intended to bring watch collectors and industry experts together via intimate, exclusive events and regular social gatherings. The team behind this unique organisation consists of watchmakers, independent brands, industry influencers and journalists.

It all started in 2012, Andreas Strehler exhibited for the first time at SalonQP in London. On the night before the opening of SalonQP, he invited a few friends and watch enthusiasts to share a drink, talk about watches and the world in general. The idea of The Night Before was born.

On the first evening only a handful of what would become a band of friends showed up at the Lansdowne Club in Mayfair. Over the years, The Night Before became an institution: A gathering of interesting people interested in the world of watches and as the guest list began to grow the Lansdowne Club became too small to host the event.

This year the event was held at The Libary in St Martins Lane. There were two sections, one of which, upstairs, was dedicated the British brands, Fears, Garrick and Pinion. It was a great opportunity firstly to see the Fears Brunswick and Pinions new Atom finally in the metal.

Pinion Atom

The Atom doesn’t disappoint at all. As you can see the design clearly says, Pinion. As we have come to expect, Piers presented a really nice well built watch. Differently to previous Pinions you first notice the slimmer (11mm) steel case, made possible by the use of the Japanese Miyota 9105 automatic movement. Using this movement also enables Pinion to offer a watch at a much lower price point than we are used to from this brand, £790. It will be very interesting to see how this bet goes.

After Fears and Pinion I managed to squeeze through to the table where Garrick’s Simon Michlmayr  was displaying their watches, I was especially keen to see the new S1. This watch is built by master watchmaker, Craig Baird, and finished entirely by hand. This is Garrick’s most complicated timepiece to date, featuring a skeletonised dial and incorporating a power reserve indicator. Only five S1 timepieces will be made per annum.

Sketch of Garrick S1

Unfortunately due lack of space and light I couldn’t get a really decent picture so to give an idea of how the watch is I have taken this picture from Garrick website.

Giles Ellis of Schofield was also present that night along with Simon Cudd, of Schofield + Cudd straps, neither was displaying their products other than those they were wearing. I did manage a dingy peek at Schofield latest watch – the Telemark.

All in all it was a very pleasant evening but being a “school night” I  thought it wise to make my way home.

After “the Night Before” comes the actual night- the first evening of this years Salon QP. The big difference between the two evenings was the lighting.

I managed to say hello again to Simon Michlmayr and to get a shot of the Garrick range.

The Garrick range

I then found the two British stands together firstly, the Fears Departure lounge that was proving very popular with the new Brunswick attracting a great deal of praise. Then next door Schofield overseen by Giles Ellis himself and Simon Cudd with his straps. Again thanks to better light I managed to get some more useful pictures.

Schofield Telemark
Schofield Daymark

After visiting the Brits I went a little of topic and had quick chat with two brands that I have admired for a while Habring from Austria and Switzerlands Czapek both really nice and like everyone super enthusiastic about their work.

On Saturday I visited the Salon again this time with my sons, in the hope of planting the seed of an interest in watches early. They were very impressed by the chocolate offered at the Fears Departure lounge.

Schofield Bronze Beater 2

If you don’t receive Schofields news letter you might have missed their latest announcement – The Bronze Beater 2 !

The Bronze Beater 2

The Bronze Beater B2 now in two finishes, raw and force-patinated. That is the raw at the bottom and the darker one above has been chemically treated to oxidise the case. The B2 will be available in less than two weeks!

The dials are double blue with a gold rim and centre. Luminescent numerals and hour markers with the other print in metallic bronze except the pink B. Hands are brushed bronze with little thorns as counterpoise.

Inside they will use an ETA 2824-2 Swiss auto.

Here are some more of Schofield’s excellent images showing more detail.

The Bronze Beater dial
Caseback

I am really looking forward to seeing these in the “bronze” at the Salon QP

 

Schofield + Cudd

My family will tell you that I pass too much time deciding which strap to use with which watch. My desire for variety has been served well over the last few years by a steady supply of NATO’s in various hues. My favourite however remaining the plain grey.

Since starting this blog I have discovered there are quiet a few people out there sharing this need for variety and distinction. People such as Carl Evans of GasGasBones I wrote about in my last post. It would appear someone has now taken this “interest” to a new higher level.

That man is Simon Cudd. Some of you will know of Simon from his beautiful photos, especially those of watches. Some months ago Simon posted some pictures of a strap for his Schofield watch made out of an old pair of Converse basketball shoes.

Schofield + Cudd Converse Strap credit: Schofield

Very cool indeed. But the story does not stop there. A new venture has just been announced specialising in unusual straps – Schofield + Cudd.   As you will see  from the website https://www.schofieldandcudd.com/ the straps are very bold. But then Schofield watches are not really for shy people.

If you cannot find a strap amongst the numerous on offer, Schofield + Cudd also offer a bespoke service. Take along a piece of your treasured material, an old leather jacket or bag and they will turn it into a unique strap for you,

Then if this is not enough they have also taken another look at an often ignored element of the look of a watch – the buckle. Look at these….

Coloured Buckles !

I just need them to branch out into making straps for other brands.

Schofield Daymark Photo Competition

The winner has been announced. You will be surprised to hear it was not me….

The lucky winner of a Schofield’s latest watch the Daymark was Mr H. and as you will see from the picture below he is a very worthy winner.

The winning picture by Mr. H.

Mr H. clearly read the brief for the competition more closely than me.  He included a “coastal structure”, something missing from my otherwise perfect entry. He also included a lighthouse for which Schofield have a bit of an affinity. Well done.

 

 

Schofield Competition

If you have read my blog before you might have guessed I enjoy the idea that you can win a new British watch.

The latest opportunity is being offered by the good people from Sussex, Schofield.

Schofield Daymaker

The competition is to win one of their latest Daymaker watches.

One feature of everything Schofield is beautiful design, always beautifully photographed, this makes the competition all the more daunting as to win it you have to submit an original photo. Given their links to the British coastline Schofield are asking contestants to enter their own coastal images.

For more details on how to win the best looking Schofield visit their website http://schofieldwatchcompany.com/competition/

Good Luck

Schofield Daymaker – More news

In their recent bulletin British watch brand  Schofield have given more detail about their new Daymaker model, which for my taste is their best looking watch so far. I especially like the crown.

Schofield Daymaker
Schofield Daymaker

These are the details they are giving currently.

The Daymark costs £3600 inclusive of VAT. Pre-ordering via deposits will be taken in January. Please contact us if you would like to get on the list.
  • Single piece case, like the Beater and Blacklamp, precision made in Germany
  • Stainless steel, vapour blast finish
  • Exhibition case back
  • Sapphire crystals front and back
  • Swiss ETA 2824 automatic movement
  • Pull-out crown engraved and filled with our Unicode lighthouse symbol
  • Dial with raised chapter ring with PVD coating
  • Laddered hands with a matt steel finish
  • High contrast daytime visibility
  • Highly luminescent markers for night-time visibility

My only comment is that I would have preferred a manual movement.